List and description of deadly snakes that occur in the Mount Moreland Conservation area

Click on an image and find out more about the listed species

The 5 Deadly species are:

 

Black Mamba - Relatively common. The mere size of these snakes makes them easily identifiable, as they AVERAGE 2.1 metres in length! Black MambaBlack Mambas are very nervous and alert and are very quick to get away from potential threats. They are diurnal and are as happy in trees as they are on the ground. Prey includes any small mammal species, including kittens and young Vervet Monkeys. Black Mambas DO NOT attack or chase people, despite reports by people of this having occurred. If they did, I'm sure I would've been dead a long time ago as I've caught well over 70 over the last 14 years. Most of them in very tricky situations like in a small shed, ceilings, under houses, in vehicles and a couple high up in trees, where the only possible escape route for the snake was down towards me…
 They are highly strung and nervous creatures, but they are not that aggressive. Don't believe the “stories” you hear, but rather the facts written by professionals that you read! These animals do not deserve or need to be killed. Leave them alone and they will leave you alone!  Undoubtedly my personal favorite Durban species!!! 
 

 

Green Mamba -  The green mamba is highly arboreal and seldom ventures to the ground unless following prey or basking. Green mambas Green Mambaare diurnal. Unlike the black mamba, it is a shy and nonaggressive snake, and does not often gape and strike if threatened but usually makes a swift and elegant escape. Continued provocation will cause the snake to strike, and bites, although serious, are uncommon.
Green mambas make their homes near trees, often in evergreen forest, coastal scrub, or moist savannah. Bamboo thickets and mango plantations are also known to be mamba habitat.
The green mamba's venom is highly neurotoxic.

     

Mozambique Spitting Cobra - Mozambique Spitting Cobras are undoubtedly the most common and widespread of all the deadly species in Mozambique Spitting CobraDurban. They are found in most areas bordering natural bush/nature reserves/rivers/dams/streams etc. Particularly where frogs and toads are abundant. They are particularly active shortly before summer and again between late summer and early autumn. This is Durban's only Cobra species and also our only “Spitting” snake. These snakes will often bask in the sun near a retreat during the day, but they are mainly nocturnal, going in search for frogs and toads which are their favourite prey items. Other prey items include rodents and smaller snakes. They employ a very effective Spit-and-flee tactic when approached, therefore bites on humans and animals are uncommon. Dogs however often receive venom in the eyes when venturing too close. Theses snakes are able to spit their venom up to three metres ! This cobra can grow to 1.5 metres in length and are very robustly built. They are most active in the early evening. 


Boomslang/African Tree-Snake - There are only a few areas around Durban where Boomslang still occur. Mount Moreland is one such Boomslang/African Tree-Snakearea. There are a very limited amount of sightings of these snakes, most of which occur during their breeding season in October/November. And often there will be more than one within a few metres of each other during this time. Birds are usually the “Whistle-Blowers” when this species is noticed. Boomslang are diurnal and arboreal. They are a very shy and gentle species and as with the Green Mamba, will also very seldomly venture onto the ground. Boomslang feed on birds, particularly fledgelings, as well as Chameleons. Boomslang average about 1,6 metres and are the only African snakes who's sex can be determined simply by looking at their colour. Males are green and females are brown. This is known as sexual dimorphism.
                                                    

Vine/Twig or Bird Snake - Due to this snakes amazing camouflage and ability to remain motionless for long periods of time, there are very Vine/Twig or Bird Snakefew sightings of this species. People have often almost picked up the “Stick on the driveway” to toss it aside, until it moved or stuck it's  bright orange tongue out ! They feed on fledgling birds, chameleons, frogs and geckos and are believed to use their bright orange and black tipped tongue as a lure.
They are an extremely shy, non aggressive, diurnal species, living in trees and dense bush. The Vine snake is our only deadly species for which there is no anti-venom available, but bite victims can be treated symptomatically or by undergoing blood transfusions.

Click on an image to see more detailed information on the Snakes that occur within the Mount Moreland Conservancy

 

 Snakes who's bites will require some medical treatment
Snakes who's bites will require some medical treatment

 Snake species who's bites are considered harmless to man
Snake species who's bites are considered harmless to man

 Harmless snakes that occur within the Mount Moreland Conservancy
Harmless snakes that occur within the Mount Moreland Conservancy